Communicating With Apple Watch

I was listening to the lastest episode of the Talk Show with guest Joanna Stern about the Apple Watch. During one section they started talking about tap as a means of communication, and the impact this might or might not have. As John wrote in his review of the watch, it’s not that hard to imagine at least a few scenarios where, for example, sharing a heartbeat would be novel, intimate, and gain even widespread use.

Having thought about this more, I do wonder if perhaps the ability to effectively touch someone from afar will turn out to be a big deal. I think it will.

You can imagine that a native SDK app might even be able to take input from one person and send that to another, enabling a morse-code method of communicating, for example.

There’s a lot more to consider here, but it seems like it’s a bigger deal than I thought it might be at first.

It also makes me wonder just how much more intrusive it will feel to be tapped by some spammy notification in an app.

On Apple Watch

Up to this point I haven’t been sold (personally) on Apple Watch. The main drawbacks as I saw them were:

  1. Price. And it’s a recurring price since you know you’ll have to upgrade every year.
  2. Size. I have small wrists and I don’t like large watches. I don’t even always wear a watch. I don’t want to wear a huge piece of jewelry on my wrist.
  3. Battery. I don’t want to charge something every night, especially when it would otherwise have utility (sleep tracking).
  4. Utility. What in the world is the Apple Watch (or any smart watch) going to do for me that I care about?

However, having listened to quite a few podcasts on the topic and read even more posts, I’m convinced now that (at least at some point) I’m going to want one.

  1. I’ll get over the price. And if the main SDK components remain the same then there isn’t that much computation being done on the watch itself. The year-over-year upgrade may not turn out to be so compelling. And if your band can last more than 2 years, you’d only have to upgrade the watch, not the band.
  2. I’ll get over the size. Everyone will have one. It won’t be so weird.
  3. I’ll get over the battery. Because there will be so much utility. Which leads me to…
  4. Utility. I’m now convinced of enough positive use cases that I think it would really be a helpful device.

A few use cases for Apple Watch:

Since my watch can know that it’s me, and therefore verify that I am, in fact, me, then it can be a presence notifier on my behalf. This leads to some pretty great conclusions:

I’m not currently planning on getting one immediately, but I think I am far more likely to purchase one than I was a few months ago.

The History of English Podcast

I was recently made aware of the great History of English Podcast.

The author, Kevin Stroud, while not a professional linguist, is a wonderful story teller. Each episode covers a combination of the etymologies of English as well as the history, that is the people, who have spoken this language in its various forms from it’s roots thousands of years ago.

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Handling Motion JPEG Streams on iOS

I have several Foscam Cameras around the outside of my house. They’re very easy to setup, tolerate the outdoor conditions admirably, and are incredibly affordable for what they offer.

As with everything else around my house, I like to build software that customizes my view into my home (or in this case, outside my home). To that end I’ve build an app I call Argos that lets me monitor all sorts of sensors on my property.

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Build Your Own High Top Tables

We recently hosted a backyard party, and we wanted some high top tables for people to be able to mingle around. We looked around online but nothing was as simple as we wanted (we were going to cover them with table clothes so they didn’t need to be fancy), and the ones we were able to find at all were pricier than we wanted. So, we did what you do when you want something to exactly match your vision: we built them.

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